Excerpt:

"Europe is committing suicide," writes Douglas Murray in the first sentence of his erudite, dispiriting, and indispensable new book, The Strange Death of Europe: Immigration, Identity, Islam. In words that I agree with but that put the matter in a way so stark that they even made me catch my breath, Murray predicts that "by the end of the lifespans of most people currently alive Europe will not be Europe and the peoples of Europe will have lost the only place the world we had to call home." This cataclysm, in Murray's view, has two causes: mass immigration and Europeans' loss of faith in European "beliefs, traditions and legitimacy." Europeans feel guilty about their past; they're "jaded," weighted down by an "existential tiredness," a feeling that their corner of the world "has run out of steam" and that their culture, for which they have insufficient regard, might just as well be replaced by another.


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