Excerpt:

The other day I took note here of a recent New York Times feature in which several prominent figures from the worlds of law and religion were invited to answer the question: Is religious freedom in America under threat?  I focused on one of the responses, entitled "A Campaign Against Patriotic Muslims," in which Salam Al-Marayati, president of the Muslim Public Affairs Council, maintained that when it came to his coreligionists, the answer was a definite yes.  Al-Marayati painted a picture of an America awash in "anti-Islam groups" and "Muslim haters" who make life difficult for American Muslims, whom he depicted as overwhelmingly peaceful, freedom-loving, and terrorism-hating.  It didn't seem to matter to the Times that Al-Marayati himself is a longtime associate of and apologist for terrorists.

Another participant in the same Times feature was Noah Feldman, a Harvard law professor.  Like Al-Marayati, Feldman claimed to be concerned about a plague of Islam-hatred in America.  Feldman complained about legislative proposals in Oklahoma and Tennessee that would "ban Islamic law from the courts — a measure that the American separation of church and state makes completely unnecessary."  Feldman concluded: "It would be nice to say these proposed laws are un-American. But they are sadly reminiscent of our history of targeting vulnerable religious minorities out of bigotry and political expediency. We can only look forward to a day when anti-Islamic sentiment seems as archaic as these other old hatreds do today."


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