Excerpt:

Our tolerance to intolerance is a familiar story. The book-burning rallies during the 1989 Rushdie affair should have been a wake-up call to religious fundamentalism. Instead we became paranoid about causing offence and tried to appease regressive community leaders who dishonestly claimed to be speaking on behalf of the "Muslim community". We lacked the confidence to challenge them or extremists, and as a result they have thrived.

It is clear we have learned little about the diversity of Muslims. We have not only been prepared to legitimise Islamist preachers and groups, we continue to hold the misguided belief that we are serving the interests of the so-called "Muslim community". We unhelpfully lump Muslims under the banner of a singular "community".

This myopic perception of Muslims is part of the problem. How many times do we hear politicians and others tell us Muslim terrorists are not "true Muslims", that they "don't represent the Muslim community"?


Read the complete original version of this item...