Excerpt:

At a conference about anti-Semitism in Europe, senior Hungarian officials said the absence of violence against Jews in their country owed to its refusal to admit Muslim immigrants.

The assertion, which at least one Jewish expert on anti-Semitism disputed, came amid criticism of Prime Minister Viktor Orban's right-wing government by other European leaders of his immigration policy, and a dispute between the Hungarian leader and some Jewish community leaders who accuse Orban of encouraging or tolerating anti-Semitic rhetoric.

Whereas other European countries have seen jihadist terrorist attacks against Jews and others in recent years, "Hungary has been consistently able to protect its citizens and residents, its borders and its fundamental elements of statehood from mass immigration and international terrorism," Minister of State for Security Policy István Mikola said Wednesday at an event in Budapest titled "Are Europe's Jews Safe?" and organized by the Hungarian Jewry's watchdog on anti-Semitism, the Action and Protection Foundation.


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