Excerpt:

For Sameeha Ahmad, the decision to put on the hijab came in psychology class at the University of Maryland. She hadn't worn one for five years. Her mom did, as did her sister. But like many young Muslim women across the U.S., the very independence that drove her to cast off the traditional head covering has since drawn her to don one.

Since the election of President Donald Trump, the debate around Islamic dress has taken a new turn: The hijab has emerged as a symbol of resistance to Islamophobia amid policies from the Trump administration targeting Muslim immigrants.

Scores of non-Muslims have donned hijabs to express solidarity with Muslim women, too, though some criticized the move, arguing that the garment represents oppression of women.


Read the complete original version of this item...