Excerpt:

When Georgia's anti-mask laws were scrawled into state code some 60 years ago, supportive legislators sought to curb anonymous violence by hooded Ku Klux Klansmen. But first-year Georgia State student Nabila Khan never guessed such a law would bring into question her niqab, a veil worn by some Muslim women which covers everything but the eyes.

On Aug. 25, during Khan's first week of college, one of her teachers held her after class to request she not conceal her face. Khan refused, claiming such an ask violated her right to freely exercise her religious beliefs.

"I wear it to work. I wear it to school," she told The Signal about her niqab. "Many people have this misconception that, as Muslim women, we're oppressed or forced to wear it. For me, it's a choice. My parents never forced me to wear it."


Read the complete original version of this item...