Excerpt:

A week before the attack on Charlie Hebdo, France's leading gay magazine, Têtu, announced the winner of its annual beauty contest. His name was Matthieu Chartraire, and he was 22, doe-eyed and six-packed, with perfectly groomed hair, stubble and eyebrows. A pin-up in every way — until he started talking.

To the anger of many of the magazine's readers, the Adonis of 2015 turns out to be an outspoken supporter of the Front National. Têtu's editor-in-chief, Yannick Barbe, refused to play censor. 'It's within his rights to vote for the FN even if we don't share his beliefs,' he said. 'This is a beauty pageant, and our readers' vote was only based on a single criterion! He only stands for himself and not for the gay community.'

Barbe has a point (although from next year, it's worth noting, entrants for Têtu's beauty contest will have to sign a code of ethics that rejects discrimination). But his assertion that Chartraire does not stand for the gay community overlooks a trend that has been accelerating over the last decade: French gay votersare falling for the Front National's leader, Marine Le Pen. A survey by the polling firm Ifop indicates a dramatic increase in support for the FN among homosexual and bisexual voters since the French presidential elections of April 2012. It showed, for instance, that in Paris 26 per cent of homosexuals supported Le Pen, compared with 16 per cent of hetero-sexuals.


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