Excerpt:

The self-proclaimed Austrian "anti-jihad"  and "anti-sharia activist" Elisabeth Sabaditsch-Wolff appeared on June 21, 2013 at the Rayburn House Office Building in Washington, DC, at an event co-sponsored by the Center for Security Policy (CSP) and the Endowment for Middle East Truth (EMET).  In introducing the event, CSP's Christine Brim called people like Sabaditsch-Wolff the "defenders of freedom" in a "struggle…to preserve free speech" and "equality under the law." Sabaditsch-Wolff's subsequent presentation of her courageous struggles in no way belied Brim's introduction.

Sabaditsch-Wolff discussed her own well-publicized ordeals and subsequent activism stemming from criticizing Islam, a faith described by her as a "religion of peace" that "is not really peaceful to those who speak the truth." Daughter of a diplomat, she had already developed reservations about Islam during her childhood stay in Iran right before the 1978-1979 revolution.  During her diplomatic tenure, postings to Kuwait encompassing the 1990 Iraq invasion and to Libya where she saw her landlord on September 11, 2001, blame the Jews for Al-Qaeda's terrorist attacks that day only increased these concerns.


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