Excerpt:

On Wednesday Dzhohkar Tsarnaev pleaded not guilty to 30 counts in the Boston Marathon bombings and jury selection began in the case of U.S. Army Major Nidal Hasan, accused of murdering 13 at Fort Hood, Texas, in 2009. The Hasan and Tsarnaev cases emerged the same day in testimony before the House Homeland Security Committee, where the first witness, Rudy Giuliani, said that political correctness hinders efforts to stop terrorists before they strike.

Guiliani, mayor of New York during the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, told the committee "You can't fight an enemy you don't acknowledge." To confront the terrorist threat effectively, "we have to purge ourselves of the practice of political correctness when it goes so far that it interferes with our rational and intellectually honest analysis of the identifying characteristics that help a discover these killers in advance."

Giuliani said that a reluctance to identify violent Islamic extremists could have played a role in the FBI's failure to track Tamerlan Tsarnaev, Dzhohkar's older brother, who last year returned to Dagestan for six months. "There would have been a much greater chance of preventing Fort Hood, and possibly — and this I emphasize is possibly — the Boston bombing," Giuliani said, "if the relevant bureaucracies had been less reluctant to identify the eventual killers as potential Islamic extremist terrorists."


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