Excerpt:

What to do? Late last Sunday night, a 23-year-old woman in Oscarshamn, a town of 17,000 people that's about halfway between Mecca and Medina – sorry, I mean Stockholm and Malmö – was on her way home when she was stopped by three young men of foreign origin. "Are you Swedish?" they asked her. When she said yes, they hit her so hard that she fell to the ground. Then, looking down at her, lying there at their feet, they said: "Welcome to Sweden. It's our country now, not yours."

The brief account I read of this incident closes with the information that the police have labeled this a "hate crime." Gee, ya think? Presumably there's no place on their checklists for "soft jihad."  (Although I'm sure there was nothing soft about the punch that knocked that young woman to the pavement.)

One thing these "soft" jihadists have going for them is that what they're engaged in is, quite simply, so audacious that –  unless you're prepared to open your mind up to the immense and terrible reality of it – it can seem almost farcical. "It's our country now, not yours"? It has the absurd ring of a pathetic claim made by some schoolyard punk. Except that those three punks in Oscarshamn aren't alone. They're certainly far from the first of their kind in Europe to make such an arrogant pronouncement. And as the years go by, that bold assertion, echoed increasingly in the streets of a growing number of European towns and cities, comes ever closer to being the plain and simple truth.


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