Excerpt:

The lights are going out all over Europe. The Christmas tree lights, that is. Not all of them all at once, mind you, but one at a time –  one here, one there, one Christmas season after another.

Just the other day, for example, came the news about a co-op apartment building in Kokkedal, Denmark.

Not long ago, the co-op, which has a considerable number of Muslim residents, spent 60,000 kroner (about $10,000) to celebrate the holiday of Eid. Three days afterwards, however, when the co-op board, consisting of five Muslims and four unbelievers, got together to decide whether to spend approximately 5000 kroner on a Christmas tree – a tradition in the building – they voted the proposition down.  Although a "private donor" later stepped in to pay for a tree, the news of the co-op board's decision had meantime made the national news, drawing two journalists from Denmark's TV2 who, after making their way to Kokkedal last weekend to investigate the story, found themselves under attack by a couple of dozen masked individuals who threw bricks and cobblestones at their van and called them "neo-Nazis."


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