Excerpt from Raymond Ibrahim's monthly roundup of Muslim persecution of Christians around the world.

Hillary Clinton believes that Muslims "have nothing whatsoever to do with terrorism."

As Muslim jihadis, mobs and regimes terrorized Christians and others throughout the world of Islam, in the West, institutions -- from governments to grade schools -- empowered and praised Islam, often at the expense of Christians.

U.S. President Barack Obama described the idea of giving preference to persecuted Christian refugees as "shameful" -- even though helping persecuted refugees is what America has always been doing and much of what it is about. "That's not American. That's not who we are. We don't have religious tests to our compassion," Obama admonished. Unfortunately for the president, statistics were soon released, indicating that "the current [refugee] system overwhelmingly favors Muslim refugees. Of the 2,184 Syrian refugees admitted to the United States so far, only 53 are Christians while 2,098 are Muslim." So, although Christians are 10% of Syria's population -- and possibly the most persecuted group -- only 2% of the refugees entering America are Christian.

Adding to the confusion, Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush falsely claimed that Syrian President Bashar Assad "executes Christians." In reality, not only have Christian minorities long been protected under the secular regime of Assad -- himself a member of a religious minority -- but many Christian refugees who fled the jihad in Iraq went to Assad's Syria for sanctuary.

Accordingly, the head of the Syrian Catholic Church, Mar Ignace Youssif III Youan, in a November interview, accused Western governments of "perpetuat[ing] the endless conflict in Syria" and of having "betrayed the Christians of the East. We explained from the beginning that our situation was different from that of other nations in the region, they were not listened to. And now we mourn deaths over the past five years. ... It's a shame that the West has abandoned Christians to this situation."

Less than a week after jihadis murdered 130 people in Paris, Hillary Clinton asserted that Muslims "have nothing whatsoever to do with terrorism."

The same pro-Islamist, anti-Christian spirit floated through some Western schools. In the United Kingdom, pupils at Oldknow Academy were reportedly led in "anti-Christian chants" in assemblies that were "like a rally" with a "plainly divisive" attitude." According to the Birmingham Mail, Asif Khan, a Muslim teacher, led pupils, shouting, "We don't believe in Christmas, do we?" and "Jesus wasn't born in Bethlehem, was he?" Children were also asked to shout: "Do we send Christmas cards? No!" and "Do we celebrate Christmas? No!" Khan denies the claims.

However, Ann Connor, an education adviser contracted to work for Department for Education who had earlier visited the school, said, "I found the school to be extraordinary. There was an element of fear." A female staff member was said to be "frightened of Mr. Khan." And a parent complained of the "increasing Islamic ethos in the school."

In the United States, a seventh-grade teacher at Spring View Middle School in Huntington Beach, California, deviated from the district's official curriculum and had students sing "This Is My Fight Song." Lyrics from the song included, "Islam ... Allah's on the way. They will preach them loud tonight. Can you hear their voice this time? This is their fight song. Spread Islam now song. Prove that they're right song."

Parents only found out about the song after some students accidentally brought the pamphlet home. "I believe that by singing the song," one of the angry parents said, "the children feel comfortable that maybe Allah is the only god and maybe that they should start following him. I'm not OK with that." The school responded by sending an apology to parents and said it would continue looking into the incident.

Raymond Ibrahim is a Judith Friedman Rosen Fellow at the Middle East Forum