The title, Islam in Europe, Revolts in the Middle East: Islamism and Genocide from Wilhelm II and Enver Pasha through Hitler and Husseini to Arafat, Usama bin Laden, and Ahmadinejad, along with Discussions with Bernard Lewis, indicates the scope of this

The title, Islam in Europe, Revolts in the Middle East: Islamism and Genocide from Wilhelm II and Enver Pasha through Hitler and Husseini to Arafat, Usama bin Laden, and Ahmadinejad, along with Discussions with Bernard Lewis, indicates the scope of this book: the increasing influence of Islamism in both the Middle East and Europe since Kaiser Wilhelm II of Germany declared himself "protector of Muslims" in 1898 up to the present.

Schwanitz, author of several important works on modern Middle Eastern history, examines in great detail the growth of Islamism, its growing impact on Europe, and anti-Islamist responses. In addition, he explores the connections between Islamism and fascism, as well as other extremist movements during the world wars and the Cold War, and their joint attack on Western liberalism. Schwanitz brings his work up to date with chapters on "the revolt years" of 2011-12, concluding with a chapter of dialogues with Bernard Lewis on the radicalization of Islam.

The author argues that Islam has not only been closely related to seminal events in modern European history but that its more radical elements are now increasingly involved in influencing European affairs. He offers compelling information about recent phenomena in Germany, the United Kingdom, France, and the Netherlands, then discusses immigration and demographic data and the increasing involvement of Muslims in their host-countries' elections and as parliamentary members. While not ignoring a certain degree of secularization and integration, the author notes an increasing polarization in which Islamists have gained influence in Europe. Schwanitz does not forecast whether the Islamic threat is likely to succeed, but he does take the possibility seriously.

This major study of ideologies, events, and trends is extensively based on interviews as well as on materials in public and private archives and many other sources. It should remain a standard work on the development of radical Islam and its political relations with Europe. An English translation would be most welcome.